Home Social gathering The news of the coronavirus of May 11, 2022

The news of the coronavirus of May 11, 2022

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The last coronavirus news from Canada and around the world on Wednesday. This file will be updated throughout the day. Web links to longer stories if available.

8am Coronavirus conditions are likely to worsen as case rates continue to rise and hospitalizations begin to rise, according to the top health official for the most populous county in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“We are also seeing quite a significant increase in reports of outbreaks, coming from schools, workplaces and other congregate settings,” said Dr. Sara Cody, director of public health and county health officer. of Santa Clara, during a press conference on Tuesday. “A lot of them are related to social gatherings. It’s spring – school is ending and people are gathering, and COVID is spreading.”

Caution is especially needed as it becomes clear that the latest circulating omicron subvariants can re-infect people who survived the earliest strains of the omicron variant in December or January. Experts had said that the earliest omicron subvariant, BA.1, likely conferred immunity to a later subvariant, BA.2.

But some experts say surviving BA.1 may not confer a high probability of avoiding infection with an even newer subvariant, BA.2.12.1, which is more infectious than BA.2.

7:22 York Region’s newest hospital got off to a flying start when it opened during a pandemic last year.

When Cortellucci Vaughan was first conceived as Ontario’s first new hospital in over 30 years, it was to meet the needs of a growing South York region.

Then the coronavirus hit and plans took a 180 degree turn.

With COVID-19 cases skyrocketing in February 2021, the hospital opened its doors to become the province’s relief valve, a much-needed space for an overstretched healthcare system.

6:41 a.m. Testing for COVID-19 has plummeted across the world, making it much harder for scientists to track the evolution of the pandemic and spot worrying new viral mutants as they emerge and spread.

Experts say testing fell 70-90% globally between the first and second quarters of this year – the opposite of what they say is set to happen with new omicron variants surging in places such as the United States and South Africa.

“We’re not testing where we might need to,” said Dr. Krishna Udayakumar, who directs Duke University’s Duke Global Health Innovation Center. “We need the ability to ramp up testing as we see new waves or surges emerging to track what’s happening” and react.

Daily cases reported in the United States, for example, average 73,633, up more than 40% in the past two weeks, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. But that’s a vast undercount due to declining testing and the fact that testing is done at home and not reported to health services. An influential modeling group from the University of Washington in Seattle estimates that only 13% of cases are reported to health authorities in the United States, which would mean more than half a million new infections every day.

The decline in testing is global, but overall rates are particularly lacking in developing countries, Udayakumar said. The number of tests per 1,000 people in high-income countries is about 96 times higher than in low-income countries, according to FIND, a Geneva-based public health nonprofit.

What is driving the decline? Experts point to COVID-related fatigue, a lull in cases after the first wave of omicron, and the feeling among some residents of low-income countries that there’s no reason to test because they don’t have access to antiviral drugs.

6:41 a.m. Coronavirus conditions are likely to worsen as case rates continue to rise and hospitalizations begin to rise, according to the top health official for the most populous county in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“We are also seeing quite a significant increase in reports of outbreaks, coming from schools, workplaces and other congregate settings,” said Dr. Sara Cody, director of public health and county health officer. of Santa Clara, during a press conference on Tuesday. “A lot of them are linked to social gatherings. It’s spring – school is ending and people are gathering, and COVID is spreading.

Caution is especially needed as it becomes clear that the latest circulating omicron subvariants can re-infect people who survived the first strains of the Omicron variant in December or January. Experts had said that the earliest omicron subvariant, BA.1, likely conferred immunity to a later subvariant, BA.2.

But some experts say surviving BA.1 may not confer a high probability of avoiding infection with an even newer subvariant, BA.2.12.1, which is more infectious than BA.2.

“Even if you got omicron during the omicron surge, you can still get COVID again, unfortunately,” Cody said.

6:35 a.m. Shanghai reaffirmed on Wednesday that it would maintain the ‘zero-COVID’ approach to eliminating a waning outbreak in China’s biggest city after the head of the World Health Organization said it was not sustainable and urged China to change its strategy.

Although progress has been made, the relaxation of prevention and control measures could allow the virus to rebound, deputy director of the Shanghai Center for Disease Control Wu Huanyu told reporters.

“At the same time, it is also the most difficult and critical time for our city to achieve zero COVID,” Wu said during a daily briefing.

“If we slack off our vigilance, the epidemic may rebound, so it is necessary to persistently implement the prevention and control work tirelessly,” he said.

Wu gave no indication that he was aware of comments from WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, who said he had spoken with Chinese experts about the need to move to a new approach in light of the news. knowledge about the virus.

“When we talk about ‘zero-COVID’, we don’t think it’s sustainable, given the current behavior of the virus and what we expect for the future,” Tedros told a news conference. tuesday.

“And especially when we now have a good knowledge, a good understanding of the virus and when we have good tools to use, the transition to another strategy will be very important,” he said.

Tedros was joined by Mike Ryan, the WHO’s emergencies chief, who said all actions to combat the pandemic should “show due respect for individual and human rights”.

Countries must “balance the control measures, the impact on society, the impact on the economy. It’s not always an easy calibration to do,” Ryan said.